Ideal blog

AI for Recruiting: News, Tips, and Trends

How To Coordinate High-Volume Hiring

High-volume hiring is a stark reality of business now. Oftentimes the context is seasonal, i.e. retail hires near the holidays, but it doesn’t need to be that pronounced. If a company has a new product launch upcoming or other business needs, they might have a random “splurge” period of high-volume hiring, which is generally defined as processes with 250 or more applicants. (An average job posting receives about 59 applicants.)

Briefly understand the current landscape

We all know the job market is tight right now. That narrative has been put forth a lot. High-volume hiring is harder in tight markets, for sure. Continue reading

How A.I. Improves Hiring In Transportation And Logistics

Is transportation and logistics hiring on the decline?

This is a complicated question. In the short-term, the answer may be yes. This is truck transportation employment in the United States over the past year or so:

The good news: From April 2018 until March 2019, roughly 35,000 new jobs were added to the trucking industry in the United States. And, broadly, hiring within the transportation and logistics sector rose by 7,300 in March after a 4,700-employee decline in February. Final piece of good news: trucking employment is still 1.9% higher than it was at this point in 2018, which outpaces the general economic growth of 1.7%. Continue reading

How A.I. Changes Hiring For Telecommunications

Is there a best practice when using AI in hiring for telecommunications roles?

Our director of business development, Diego, actually has a Bachelors in Telecommunications Engineering. We’ve been working with companies in the space for years. Hiring can be tricky in telcom because there are dozens of potential roles, from strategic in-HQ operatives all the way to field service reps. How do you make sure you’re maximizing your hiring process?

First: know the trends

Customer experience is a huge trend in telecommunications for 2019 and beyond. Consumers have more choice, but also more devices — and those devices are increasingly connected. Continue reading

Does The Marketplace Have A Skills Gap?

Has the idea of a skills gap been brought up in your organization?

Does a skills gap exist? And what should you do about it?

The idea of a “skills gap” has gotten considerable attention in the past year or so. The basic argument is very logical: Technology is evolving rapidly, and that’s created “gaps” where employers need specific skills, but it’s increasingly hard to find them. Considering the Internet itself is only 30 years old and many professions today have Internet skills/capabilities tied to them, it makes perfect sense that the “skills gap” must exist.

Or does it not?

There are arguments to the contrary on the skills gap

Recently there have been a number of discussions on the idea that the skills gap never really existed, notably here and here. Continue reading

The Psychology Of Candidates For Financial Institutions

Many recruiters don’t consider the psychology of how to approach different industries and verticals, even though they’re recruiting human beings, so psychology is going to play a role somewhere.

Here are 5 steps to understanding the psychology of candidates for financial institutions.

Step 1: Make sure you’re undeniably professional

While financial services are now embracing digital and mobile and tech overall, it’s still a traditional industry in terms of processes and behaviours.

And because salaries for early-stage career hires are higher than in many other industries, there’s an expectation of professionalism throughout the process. This means making sure you’re on time to all meetings, presenting well physically for any in-person appointments, and having strong grammar in any email correspondence. Continue reading

How To Automate The Employee Referral Process

According to Silkroad, employees referrals are still the top source of hire at 30% of all hires. With the market getting even tighter, leveraging referrals is more important than ever.

Your current employees are likely to know people who would be good fits for roles you need. When a referral program works well, recruiters are a lot less stressed.

Why don’t more companies use referral programs?

The main reason is that referral programs are time-consuming.

At a RecruitingDaily event in Atlanta, the consensus among recruiters was that while referrals are an effective channel for them, it can take up to 70% of their time in a given week to manage it. Continue reading

How The Best Recruiters Spend Their Time

What should you be doing as a recruiter? Most would answer this by simply shifting the word: You should be recruiting, of course.

Makes logical sense. But recruiting involves lots of different things:

    Relationship-building Sourcing Screening Scheduling interviews Conducting interviews Working with hiring managers Moving through the process Working with HR on an offer Onboarding

It’s a lot. There are theoretically 40 work hours in a work week, although many of us do work more.

Science has shown that about 55 hours/week is a hard ceiling on productivity. That’s 10+ hours/day Monday to Friday.

A percentage of that time will be taken up by calls and meetings. Continue reading

4 Departments Talent Acquisition Should Partner With

To most people, recruiting is “a HR thing.” That’s the silo it belongs to. Silos are very prevalent in business. In fact, Machiavelli discussed silos in 1513.

But we also work in a time when collaboration is super important. Teams are scattered all over the country or even the world, and the strategy often involves a “road map,” which means A needs to be finished before B gets started. Groups need to come together to hit goals.

The “knowledge economy” we often reference is really a “collaboration economy.” Collaboration and silos don’t typically go well together.

All this said, what other departments should talent acquisition be working with the most? Continue reading

Is Time To Hire Still A Key Recruiting Metric?

If you work in a tech-driven atmosphere, time to hire is still important, even increasingly so. A lot of tech organizational planning is based on road maps and sprints with sequential budgets (e.g., Project A must be finished before Project B can commence).

If this how you’re doing planning and budgeting, speed in hiring is crucial. You need to get the right people – and fast. This means thinking really strategically about remote workers, salary bands, how to source effectively, and everything else that would go into a quality hire discussion.

But there’s another school of thought, embraced by people such as Malcolm Gladwell, that recruiters have too much of a focus on speed, and should slow down and think more about what they actually need. Continue reading

Capturing The Time Value Of Recruiting Automation

There’s an increasing body of research that shows human beings don’t use our time all that well, including this study on how judges schedule their time.

One of the key findings of this research is:

“For knowledge workers and managerial positions, there is evidence from time diaries that all sorts of workers schedule their workflow ineffectively, in the sense that they tend to jump from one task to another too frequently.

They spread themselves thin, and then they achieve less than they would if they worked on something until completion.”

If you’re reading this, you’re likely in recruiting, sourcing, or talent acquisition. Continue reading