Ideal blog

AI for Recruiting: News, Tips, and Trends

How To Build A Better Recruiting Team

The process of building out a very strong recruiting team is often one of the biggest challenges managers face.

How can your recruiting team be more effective? Here are a few things to consider.

An intro to effective team-building

Here’s a useful article detailing five strategies for a high impact team.

There’s some good stuff in there including the power of simplicity in business. They also talk about vulnerability and humility, which are very good traits, especially for the team leader.

One interesting thing in the article is an idea that “team-building is not a cocktail party.”

What does that mean? Continue reading

A Buyer’s Checklist For AI Recruiting Software

According to LinkedIn’s Recruiting Trends 2018, 67% of recruiters say AI helps them save time, 43% believe it removes human bias, and 31% say it delivers the best candidate matches.

So if you’re in talent acquisition, investing in AI seems like a smart move. But how do you decide which AI tool is right for you?

I break it down in our new 11-point buyer’s checklist on AI for recruiting software.

Section 1: Questions for your team

Your decision making process for buying AI for recruiting software starts with the questions you ask your team (and yourself).

A good starting point is asking yourself: what’s our biggest pain point? Continue reading

3 Essential Considerations When You Buy Recruitment Tech

Have you ever heard the term “shelf-ware?”

That’s when your company buys software but no one inside the company really uses it once it’s bought, so it sits on the shelf. Get it?

Shelf-ware is extremely costly to a company. Basically, buying something for a bunch of money, never adopting it, and likely renewing it at the end of the contract.

No one wants to throw money away. So how do you make sure that the software you invest in actually gets used and doesn’t become shelf-ware?

Here are three important factors to consider when you buy recruitment technology.

#1: Integrations with your current recruiting stack

Make sure whatever you are considering purchasing integrates with your existing workflows. Continue reading

How The Best Recruiters Spend Their Time

What should you be doing as a recruiter? Most would answer this by simply shifting the word: You should be recruiting, of course.

Makes logical sense. But recruiting involves lots of different things:

    Relationship-building Sourcing Screening Scheduling interviews Conducting interviews Working with hiring managers Moving through the process Working with HR on an offer Onboarding

It’s a lot. There are theoretically 40 work hours in a work week, although many of us do work more.

Science has shown that about 55 hours/week is a hard ceiling on productivity. That’s 10+ hours/day Monday to Friday.

A percentage of that time will be taken up by calls and meetings. Continue reading

Automation In Talent Acquisition: Why Recruiters Don’t Need To Worry

The rise of AI in various industries is an interesting and far-reaching discussion.

A very small percentage of people are at the forefront of working with the technologies involved, most are aware of the potential ramifications, and some are choosing to ignore it.

AI was actually initially developed at a 1956 conference at Dartmouth University. As of yet, it’s not quite at scale.

This is what we do know, however: it’s likely AI will take away jobs. The number most reported by reputable sources seems to be somewhere between 35-47% of jobs could be automated away in the next 25 years. Continue reading

4 Major Effects Of AI On Recruiting & Diversity

While AI for recruiting’s primary function is to streamline or automate some part of the the workflow especially repetitive, time consuming tasks, one intriguing benefit is its potential to minimize unconscious bias.

Here are 4 mechanisms on how AI is reducing bias in recruiting and its effect on diversity.

1. Job Postings  

An AI technique called sentiment analysis can identify exclusionary language (e.g., aggressive, competitive, brilliant) that research has found may turn off certain groups of candidates.

For example, studies by researchers at the University of Waterloo has found job postings that use adjectives like aggressive and competitive attract fewer female candidates. Continue reading

Why You Should Be Building Proactive Recruiting Pipelines

About 5 years ago, I had the opportunity to talk to some executives at one of the biggest technical recruiting firms in North America. They pointed me towards one of their recruiters, who was generating more money for the firm than anyone, as well as bigger placements.

The funny thing was, though, she never worked on open requisitions, which was the strategy of 99% of the recruiters employed by the firm. Instead, she simply had built an amazing proactive pipeline, while it definitely took time – now she was just reaping the rewards of said proactive pipeline.

What is proactive recruiting? Continue reading

Removing the “Busy” Excuse From The Candidate Experience

 

Despite so many technological evolutions in recruiting, it appears candidate experience isn’t actually improving that much.

For example, 60% of candidates have had a bad candidate experience, and 65% have never heard once about the status of their application. 72% of hiring managers feel they provide clear job descriptions, but only 36% of candidates feel the same.

What gives?

We have tons of research and ideas out there on candidate experience, we’ve also written about it.

The information, processes, and best practices are out there but organizations, hiring managers, and recruiting teams aren’t getting it right.

Why would this be? Continue reading

Capturing The Time Value Of Recruiting Automation

There’s an increasing body of research that shows human beings don’t use our time all that well, including this study on how judges schedule their time.

One of the key findings of this research is:

“For knowledge workers and managerial positions, there is evidence from time diaries that all sorts of workers schedule their workflow ineffectively, in the sense that they tend to jump from one task to another too frequently.

They spread themselves thin, and then they achieve less than they would if they worked on something until completion.”

If you’re reading this, you’re likely in recruiting, sourcing, or talent acquisition. Continue reading