Ideal blog

AI for Recruiting: News, Tips, and Trends

Common Hiring Practices That Are Terrible For Diversity – And What To Do Instead

We can all agree that good intentions aren’t enough when it comes to hiring practices that increase diversity.

Part of the problem is that sometimes practices that seem good on the surface aren’t necessarily effective and can even be harmful in some cases.

Here are 4 common hiring practices that are terrible for diversity and what you can do instead.

Bad hiring practice #1: The Rooney rule

The tech industry faces a lot of criticism for its relative lack of diversity. On the flip side, tech companies are also often the ones spearheading diversity initiatives in the first place.

For example, last year Salesforce implemented their version of the Rooney Rule by interviewing at least one female candidate or underrepresented minority for executive positions. Continue reading

4 Steps You Can Take To Remove Recruitment Bias

Recruitment bias has been a major topic in talent acquisition circles lately, including global discussions on pay gaps.

Recruitment bias can take many forms such as unconscious biases like confirmation bias and the halo effect.

Although there’s an increasing awareness that the 50% failure rate for hiring is linked to pre-existing biases, only 68% of companies are measuring diversity and inclusion in their hiring processes.

If we know that recruitment bias is a problem and increased diversity and transparency is a goal, how do we remove it? Is it possible?

Short answer: yes. But it requires a high degree of commitment. Continue reading

How Recruiters Can Stop Unconscious Bias During Resume Screening [Video]

Research confirms unconscious bias in recruiting is still a major problem.

Learn more in our video below:

A recent study found unconscious bias occurs during resume screening. Asian applicants were 75% more likely to get a callback for an interview when they used a “whitened” version of their name (e.g., Luke instead Lei).

Black applicants were 160% more likely to get a callback for an interview when they used a “whitened” version of their name (e.g., L. Smith instead of Latisha Smith).

If you think minority applicants with similar qualifications to majority candidates are being overlooked at your company, it might be time to look into a technology solution. Continue reading

The 5 Best Resources Online For Reducing Recruiting Bias

It’s clear that recruiting bias is still a major topic of concern.

Last month, 175 CEOs united to be a part of the CEO Action for Diversity and Inclusion alliance including organizations that span from Walmart to Major League Baseball.

As part of their pledge, one of their main goals is to mitigate recruiting bias and other types of biases in the workplace.

One benefit that has resulted from all this attention is that a lot of companies have started to develop resources on how to educate ourselves on these biases in order to help reduce their negative effects.

Here’s a list of the 5 best resources online for reducing recruiting bias. Continue reading

HR Compliance Basics For Recruiters: A Q&A With Lawyer Kate Bischoff

HR compliance may not be the most exciting topic around but it’s one that recruiters need to understand to do their jobs ethically and legally.

With laws at the federal, state, and local levels, compliance can be a confusing and complicated issue.  That’s why I spoke with employment lawyer, Kate Bischoff, to share her expertise on the basics of HR compliance that every recruiter should know.

What does being compliant mean in the context of recruiting?

Compliance in recruiting is currently focused on discrimination, specifically disparate treatment and impact.

In the future, issues around the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and privacy will become more important. Continue reading

Blind Hiring: A How-To Guide To Reduce Bias & Increase Diversity

The government of Canada recently made headlines for their blind hiring pilot project: removing candidates’ names before hiring managers review their applications.

Government officials state this blind hiring initiative is designed to “reduce unconscious bias” and “promote gender and ethnic equality.”

The original blind hiring experiments were conducted by orchestras when musicians started auditioning behind a screen to hide their gender.

This blind auditioning increased female musicians in the top symphony orchestras in the United States from less than 5% in 1970 to 25% in the 1990s.

To help you achieve similar goals for your recruiting, I’ve created this how-to guide on using blind hiring to reduce bias and increase diversity. Continue reading

5 Recruiting Tips To Increase Diversity In the Workplace

A new Deloitte survey finds companies’ interest in diversity in the workplace is focused on bias in recruiting and the use of new tools to reduce this bias.

68% of companies they surveyed measure and monitor diversity and inclusion in their recruiting.

The appeal of diversity in the workplace is recognized by both sides of the recruiting equation. A Glassdoor survey found 67% of job seekers believe diversity is an important factor when considering companies and job offers, whereas 57% of recruiters say their talent acquisition strategies are designed to attract diverse candidates.

To help you capture this competitive advantage, here are 5 recruiting tips for increasing diversity in the workplace.  Continue reading

Diversity Recruitment: 5 Proven Strategies For Workplace Diversity

Diversity recruitment is a top priority these days. A SHRM survey found that 57 percent of HR professionals say their recruiting strategies are designed to attract diverse candidates. 

Here are 5 proven strategies for improving your workplace diversity recruitment.

1. Offer flexibility as a workplace perk

Flexible work schedules and work-life balance are the most desired perks for women and Millennials. 

2. Use a pre-hire assessment to measure candidates’ personalities and skills

Personality assessments increase workplace diversity because they lack adverse impact (i.e., the scores do not differ for minority candidates).

Diversity recruitment methods that reduce unconscious bias such as objective assessments are a great tool to help companies achieve workplace equality.   Continue reading

Diversity And Inclusion: A Beginner’s Guide For HR Professionals

Josh Bersin called diversity and inclusion the top priority of 2016.

With Salesforce’s pledge to achieve workplace equality through its recent appointment of their first Chief Equality Officer and diversity initiatives at more than 75% of Fortune 1000 companies, his prediction is coming true.

Companies that embrace diversity and inclusion in all aspects of their business statistically outperform their peers. – Josh Bersin

To help you achieve this competitive advantage, I’ve created this beginner’s guide for HR on definitions, best practices, and strategies for workplace diversity and inclusion.

What is workplace diversity?

Workplace diversity is understanding, accepting, and valuing differences between people including those:

    of different races, ethnicities, genders, ages, religions, disabilities, and sexual orientations with differences in education, personalities, skill sets, experiences, and knowledge bases

Interestingly, research by Deloitte finds that diversity is perceived differently by generations. Continue reading

Diversity Hiring: 6 Steps To Hiring More Diverse Candidates

People analytics thought leader Josh Bersin has stated that workplace diversity and inclusion is a top priority for 2016. Companies have notably stepped up. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has pledged $300 million to increase the diversity hiring of women and underrepresented minorities.

It’s time to step up and do more. It’s not good enough to say we value diversity. -Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO

That’s why I’ve created this 6 step how-to guide for attracting diverse candidates to help you achieve your diversity hiring goals.

What is diversity hiring? A definition

Diversity hiring is hiring based on merit with special care taken to ensure procedures are free from biases related to a candidate’s age, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and other personal characteristics that are unrelated to their job performance. Continue reading